Category Archives: Recipes

For Thanksgiving: A Turkey Cheese Ball

turkey-cheese-ballI think this is pretty darn cute. It’s a standard cheese ball — nothing fancy in the way of ingredients — cheddar, chives, cream cheese, a little pepper and Dijon Mustard — but, ah, it’s the way you decorate this cheese ball that takes it into sublime territory.

My only worry is that people will not want to mess it up. But it sounds delicious! Put this out with your crudites this Thanksgiving!

From your friends at Hallmark. Download the recipe and decorating instructions.

Cool Yule Recipe: Candy Cane Brownies

A candy cane hanging on a Christmas tree

Here’s a holiday recipe from Sara Ayyash, pastry chef at The Jefferson Hotel in Richmond, Virginia.

Candy Cane Brownies

Yields: 2 dozen brownies

  • 2 sticks unsalted butter
  • 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 3 candy canes, finely crushed
  • 2 York ® peppermint patties, chopped

In the microwave, melt the butter and chocolate, stirring every 30 seconds till melted.

Let the chocolate cool to room temperature.

Preheat the oven to 350 and grease a 13×9 inch pan.

All at once, add the sugar, eggs, flour, salt, and vanilla to the cooled chocolate. Stir until completely
combined.

Pour the brownie batter into the prepared pan and sprinkle the crushed candy canes and chopped peppermint patties on top.

Bake for 25 minutes. Let cool completely before cutting into squares.

Thalhimer’s Spoon Bread

My mom used to make this for us, as a breakfast dish.  I can’t wait to make it.

Finding Thalhimers

In today’s Food Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch, I noticed that they had included a recipe for Thalhimers’ Richmond Room Spoonbread in a “Recipes Remembered” column. What a great holiday side dish! Here it is for you to make at home. Mine never tastes as good as the ACTUAL Thalhimers’ spoon bread, but memories are always romanticized with the passage of time. Let me know how it works out for you by sharing your results on the Finding Thalhimers Facebook page!

THALHIMERS’ RICHMOND ROOM SPOONBREAD  

(courtesy: Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Makes 9 servings

1/4 cup butter, melted

3/4 cup white cornmeal

1 1/2 cups boiling water

1/2 cup flour

1 1/2 cups whole milk

4 eggs

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder (Must be Rumford brand, according to Thalhimers’ staff)

1 pinch salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour butter into an 8-inch-square baking pan. Place cornmeal in…

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Winter Berry Salad Wreath with Lemon Poppy Seed Dressing

Isn’t this a gorgeous salad for the holidays?

winter berry salad wreath

Full recipe and assembly instructions here:

Winter Berry Salad Wreath w/ Lemon Poppy Seed Dressing.

Diet-Friendly Thanksgiving Tips

Thanksgiving Dinner, Falmouth, Maine, USA 2008

Image via Wikipedia

“You can’t have Thanksgiving without turkey. That’s like Fourth of July without apple pie, or Friday with no two pizzas.” — Joey, Friends

Thanksgiving dinner can be a healthy meal, if you approach it sensibly, and it only comes once a year, so I think you should enjoy it.  But don’t let it sabotage your weight management plan, either.

Figure Out Those Calories!

Are you wondering how many calories will be in your Thanksgiving dinner?  You’ve got to try this very cool Thanksgiving dinner calorie calculator.

Before the Thanksgiving meal…

  • Eat breakfast. Skipping meals will cause you to overeat. Consider oatmeal, eggs or Greek yogurt.
  • Drink water. Sometimes you can confuse being hungry with being dehydrated.
  • Exercise. Take a brisk walk or join one of the Thanksgiving Day walks/races.
  • Skip the alcohol. Did you know that people drink more alcohol on Thanksgiving than on any other holiday? And the night before Thanksgiving is when the heaviest drinking occurs. Alcohol has lots of calories and it lowers your inhibitions, tempting you to eat more.
  • If appetizers are available, skip the crackers and cheese and eat veggies and olives, instead.

Preparing a meal vs. Dining Out

There is no question you will save calories if you choose to dine out rather than prepare a big meal. It is one thing to have one calorie-laden meal…it’s another to have second helpings and leftovers later.

The average, home-cooked Thanksgiving meal is about 3,000 calories, not counting alcohol or appetizers. That’s too much! By contrast, the Thanksgiving meal at Cracker Barrel is 570 calories. Portion control is EVERYTHING.

Cutting calories without sacrificing flavor

If you do choose to make your own meal, there are lots of ways you can save calories and still make your meal taste delicious.

  • Turkey is a real winner for dinner. It has more protein than chicken, ham or beef.
  • Make mashed potatoes with buttermilk and add some garlic or chives if you want more flavor. Result: 80 calories a serving.
  • Use a dry gravy mix or canned turkey gravy. You will save 125 calories a serving.
  • Make stuffing with chicken stock or vegetable stock instead of butter. It will still be moist and delicious but much lower in fat.
  • You’ll save 200 calories a serving if you eat steamed green beans instead of green bean casserole. I know, I love it, too.
  • One serving of cranberry sauce is 1/4 cup and 110 calories. See if you can get by with a tablespoon instead.
  • Just eat one roll — it’s about 100 to 150 calories.
  • Choose pumpkin pie for dessert. It has the least calories. If you choose apple pie or pecan pie, just be aware you are also choosing up to 400 extra calories. Fortunately, that spray can whipped cream only has 15 calories, so you can be lavish with that! I don’t eat the crust of my pumpkin pie — that’s where a lot of the fat and calories live and I’m fine without it or just a nibble of it.
  • Another treat? Coffee or decaf with Coffeemate pumpkin spice creamer (35 calories a tablespoon). Add some spray whipped cream and cinnamon on top! Or have a cup of peppermint tea to ease your digestion, or chamomile tea to relax.

How do you keep your diet on track during Thanksgiving?  Will you be working out on Turkey Day?

Gingered Pumpkin-Pear Soup Recipe

Though the pears pictured do not have a textur...

Image via Wikipedia

I was lamenting that I had lost this recipe forever.  I cut it out of a magazine in the 1998 and couldn’t find it for a couple of years.  Guess what. I found it in a bag of stuff in the basement, which is a good thing because this is the best soup ever.  The cooks (N. Coult and K. Moerke) won a $400 prize for it.  So it is award-winning soup 🙂

Lots of time I think it’s just fine to mess around and substitute ingredients.  Not this time. If you make this exactly like this, it will be fantastic.  But don’t wimp out and leave out a little detail, like the lime peel, because the lime peel absolutely MAKES this soup sing.

So here it is. So easy.  Vegetarian! Only 129 calories a serving. Makes 6 small servings.  Life is good.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup chopped sweet onion
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 3 pears, peeled, cored, and sliced (actually, you can use canned pears, not in syrup)
  • 1 15 oz can of pumpkin (the small one)
  • 1-1/2 cups of vegetable broth
  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1/4 cup of light dairy sour cream
  • 1/2 tsp. finely shredded lime peel
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lime juice
  • more shredded lime peel for garnish

Directions: In a large saucepan, cook onion and ginger in hot butter until onion is tender.  Stir in pears, cook 1 minute more.  Stir in canned pumpkin and vegetable broth; heat to boiling.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, about 5 minutes more or until pears are tender.  Cool slightly.  In a blender container or food processor, cover and blend 1/2 of pumpkin mixture at a time, until smooth, about 1 minute.  Return processed mixture to saucepan; stir in milk.  Heat through.  Season to taste with salt and white pepper (if desired).

Meanwhile, in a small bowl stir together sour cream, 1/2 tsp of lime peel, and lime juice.  Top each serving of soup with a drizzle of lime sour cream mixture. Garnish with a little additional lime peel.

Success Tips for Holiday Cookie Baking

I’ve discovered a few tricks and gadgets that are making my holiday cookie baking much more successful this year.

Parchment paper. Most of my cookie recipes call for an ungreased cookie sheet.  This year, I’m lining my cookie sheet with parchment paper. I just discovered how much easier it is making my cookie-baking.  A sheet of parchment paper can be reused, batch after batch.  When the cookies are done, you slip the paper, cookies and all, onto wire racks to cool (minimum 2 minutes).  I am finding that the cookies bake more evenly, don’t break when I try to lift them from the paper, and I don’t have to clean the pan between batches.  At Safeway, look for the display of parchment paper that offers a 75-cents-off coupon.

Cookie scoop and silicon turner. My sister swore by using this handled cookie scoop for cookie dough.  (It looks like a small ice cream scoop.)  At first, I wondered, why not just use spoons?  But when I saw a Betty Crocker set of a cookie scoop plus cookie turner at Wal-Mart for about $3, I decided to try it.  The scoop does a couple of things.   It does make it a lot easier to scoop and produce evenly sized cookies.  It is also easier to use every scrap of dough in the mixing bowl, so there is less waste (and more cookies!).  I feel as if the scoop does not overly work the dough (the way scraping with two spoons might), which results in a lighter cookie texture.  I am also a big fan of the thin, flexible turner that came in the set.  It really does work better than the other turners I have for lifting cookies.

Cookie mixes. I usually make cookies to give as gifts, using recipes I have relied on year after year, and using the best ingredients, such as real vanilla and unsalted butter.  This year, I find I just don’t have the time to bake from scratch.  I still wanted to make cookies, however, so I bought several bags of Betty Crocker cookie dough mix in various flavors.  They are on sale at Safeway for about $1.25 a bag (each bag makes 2-3 dozen cookies).  I am having good success with all of them, and they save a great deal of time, and there aren’t as many utensils and bowls to clean.  It’s a good compromise, if you are also pressed for time.

You can elaborate on the cookie mixes using these recipes from Betty Crocker, available online at http://www.bettycrocker.com.  To save time, I may skip rolling out dough and making cut-out cookies this year and bake the jam-filled thumbprint cookies with the Betty Crocker sugar cookie mix, instead.

Cook Book. While we’re talking Betty Crocker, I should also mention that I think the latest Betty Crocker cook book is a winner, especially for less experienced cooks, like myself.  The cookbook is unique in that it provides photographs of how your cookies should look when done.  It shows what a cookie looks like if you use too much butter or flour, and how it should look when it is just right.

A few more cookie-baking tips…

Use fresh ingredients. For the best flavor, use fresh ingredients for everything. Don’t use last year’s shortening, oil, baking soda, baking powder, flour, candy or nuts.  If you are in doubt, toss it.  The exception is vanilla extract, which lasts indefinitely.  Even spices lose their life after too long on the shelf (about one to four years, depending on the type).  Also, some might swear by them, but I don’t have good experience with cooking sprays and I don’t like what they do to my pans.

Refrigerate the dough after you mix it. This will help prevent cookie spread (cookies baking too flat and thin).

Let your cookie sheets cool between batches. If you put cookies on warm sheets, they may spread while baking.

Toast nuts before adding to the dough. Toasted nuts have the best flavor.  You can toast pecans, walnuts, and almonds in about 7 minutes or less in a 400 degree oven.

Using an expensive spice? Like cardamon or star anise?  Try an Indian spice store.  You may find good deals on spices.

What do you use to bake great cookies?  Have you found the perfect cookie sheet?  Do you have a great recipe?  Feel free to add them in the comments!